An RV camping in a national park

Best Current RV Travel Destinations (and Why)

For the perfect balance of safety, relaxation, and enjoyment at a wallet-friendly price, consider visits to state and national parks that have RV campgrounds.

Reasons Why You Should Consider State and National Parks

Unlike most RV resorts or parks that place profit over beauty and cram in as many campers as possible, state and national parks provide much more space between campsites.

Many park campgrounds have such a fantastic layout that you may not even see your RV neighbor!

Setting up your RV in a secluded, private campsite is the “breath of fresh air” everyone needs right now. No worries about Covid-19, masks, or strangers getting too close.

Taking advantage of the many free recreational offerings state and national parks deliver is another plus. Set up your RV at the campsite, open your door, and you are steps away from hiking, swimming, walking your dog, kayaking, riding your bike, bird watching, and more.

Both state and national parks offer annual passes and listings of all their campgrounds that accommodate recreational vehicles. Seniors and service members also receive additional discounts on campsite pricing.

Be aware that most campgrounds at national and state parks only offer electrical and water hookups for RVs. Some newer campgrounds may offer full hookups but expect to use the dump station and not have a direct sewer hookup on most park campsites.

Have You Considered Boondocking (Dry Camping)?

A secondary travel destination is to park your RV and do some boondocking (or dry camping) on BLM land. Not only is BLM camping free or super-low cost, but it’s also often in remote locations that keep you far from any camping neighbors.

Many RVers learn that boondocking is not as unpleasant as it sounds. When you bring enough water, can set up a campfire (or your propane grill) for cooking, and don’t mind following some guidelines for going to the bathroom, you can enjoy real peace and quiet away from the stresses of home.

Boondocking RVers often add a solar panel or two to their camper to keep lights running or go full-board to run appliances. In any scenario, the use of a portable solar electric-generating system is a handy piece of RV equipment to consider.

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